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The Art of Ric Moreira
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ric moreira
St. Petersburg , Florida - United States
Mixed Media & Collage - Abstract


My abstract paintings are the intersection of very deep and personal inner emotions, the materials and medium I'm using, and the environment in which I am working.  I'm in a state of constant dialogue with my work, allowing these emotions and my insecurities to significantly manipulate the development of the paintings.
    In these, my latest works, I am exploring surface tension.  Not only are the visuals meant to partially represent this tension but the application of the materials themselves came about through tension.  Our lives are a constant interplay of tension and our behavior is the outward expression of this.  These paintings are an exploration of tension through abstract shapes and their relationships.
phone: (727) 692 5062
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The Root of All Things Art Exhibit
2011-10-13
The Root of All Things Art Exhibit
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.OFFICIAL INVITE **ZOMBICON 2011**
Saturday, October 15, 6:00pm-12:00am
David AcevedoJason FleenorLeo ChicoRandi EvansKayleigh JonesJesse Collins.RSVP:Yes · No · Maybe.Time Saturday, October 1 at 7:00pm - October 29 at 10:00pm

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Location RodezArt.com Gallery
CocoWalk, 3015 Grand Ave. #237
Coconut Grove, FL

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Created By George Rodez

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More Info In celebration of Hispanic Heritage Month Rodez Art Gallery proudly invites you to the collective exhibition that pays tribute to Contemporary Hispanic Visual Artists of South Florida & beyond. We celebrate the culture and traditions of artists who trace their roots to Spain, Mexico, Central and South America, and the Spanish speaking countries of the Caribbean.

Art being the universal language, it touches the heart of all peo...ple; it is an immortal legacy that will prevail in the history and heritage of each nation today and for future generations to come.

We welcome you to meet the artists of our time who have embarked on a mission to preserve their culture through the unspoken language of color, composition, expressions and imagery, as did the masters that have come before them, such as Pablo Picasso, El Greco, Frida Kahlo, Diego Rivera, Remedios Varo, Wifredo Lam, Francisco de Goya, Joan Miro, and Obregon, just to name a few.

Participating Hispanic Heritage Artists Include:

DAVID ACEVEDO, ORESTES BOUZON, XAVIER BRIGNONI, MARU CARRERAS, ROBERTO CATASUS, JOSE CHIU, RUBEN CUKIER (creator of the image invitation), VICENTE DOPICO-LERNER, LIDIA GODOI, ISRAEL GUEVARA, MILA HAJJAR, PABLO HERNANDEZ, MARCELO HOLZINGER, SALOMON KHAMMI, MANO, SANTOS MENDEZ, TONY MENDOZA, RIC MOREIRA, ANTONIO NUÑEZ, RAFAEL PONCE, JACQUELINE ROCH, GEORGE RODEZ, FELIX GONZALEZ SANCHEZ, MARI SANCHEZ, CESAR SANTALO, ANICA SHPILBERG, and DANIA SIERRA.

The exhibition opens to the public on Saturday, October 1 during Coconut Grove Gallery Walk and will be on view through October 29, 2011. Gallery hours are Monday through Thursday, 11 am to 7 pm, and Friday & Saturday, 11 am to 10 pm.

Gallery hours are Monday through Thursday, 11:00 a.m. to 7:00 p.m. and Friday and Saturday, 11:00 a.m. to 10:00 p.m.

CocoWalk, 3015 Grand Ave., Suite 237, Coconut Grove, FL 33133, Tel: 786.467.7111



2011-06-10
Reprinted from gulf coast times January 2011
By: Yohana de la Torre

Surface tension
Neo-Abstract Expressionist, Ric Moreira

To Neo-Abstract Expressionist, Ric Moreira, creating has been his most important form of self expression for as long as he can remember.
"As a child, I remember wanting colored pencils and sketch books more than anything else. I seldom played with toys and was happiest when drawing, often for hours," Moreira recounts.
Originally from Portugal, Moreira and his family migrated to the United States during his younger years. He graduated from the University of Massachusetts in 1990 and started his artistic journey in 1992 after attending the school of the Museum of Fine Arts. Currently, he lives in Saint Petersburg, Florida creating a full spectrum of raw images--images that transcend genre and essentially exude purity and emotional expressiveness.
"My abstract paintings are the intersection of very deep and personal inner emotions, the materials and medium I'm using, and the environment in which I am working," he says. "I'm in a state of constant dialogue with my work, allowing these emotions and my insecurities to significantly manipulate the development of the paintings."
Moreira's work is characterized by a less conventional approach to the expressionistic style. His pieces appear like a rejection of traditional standards, but in all reality are a playful presentation of them. The works have a strong focus toward light and depth, with a touch of mystery.
"I believe that there isn't a way to learn to paint abstracts," he says. "The process flows from you, with no destination, no finish line. It's a process where you will always be learning and discovering, as you are painting, and as you go."
To the average eye, Moreira seems to leave things to chance. But he actually explained that when applying materials to the canvas, he is always aware of the surface tension and the different elements, the composition creates. As he progresses, he uses this tension to help direct him to further manipulate the composition.
You can see this in Untitled #17 from his 2009 series. In this painting, the composition developed from the tension between the large black area and the large circle.
He goes on to describe that our lives are a constant interplay of tension and our behavior is the outward expression of this. His paintings are an exploration of that tension through abstract shapes and their relationships.
The result is radical, conceptual innovations that engage the viewer because of the ambivalent emotional tone they have.
"My work often feels like a visual diary of my life," he adds. "They are deeply personal and incredibly private. Yet it is my intent to only provide a catalyst for the viewer emotionally, to glean their own emotional context."
Moreira's art is dimensional. He shatters the flatness of the drawing plane because his eye sees art as not being static and finite. Instead, art is in space and somewhat in motion.
That is apparent in his slashing brushstrokes, strong color contrasts, and simple subject matter which make art "a visual language and catalyst for the viewer to develop their own emotional context."

-The work of Ric Moreira will exhibit the entire month of January 2011 at daas Gallery, located 1542 Broadway Street in Downtown Fort Myers, FL. An opening reception is scheduled for January 7, 2011 in conjunction with the monthly Art Walk. For more information, call (239) 939-1194.



Article in Florida Weekly newspaper
2011-05-12

The year begins at daas Gallery with the fascinating abstract art of Portuguese master Ric Moreira. The opening reception for “Surface Tension” is scheduled for Friday, Jan. 7, in conjunction with the monthly Fort Myers Art Walk.

Originally from Portugal, Mr. Moreira and his family migrated to the United States during his younger years. He graduated from the University of Massachusetts in 1990 and started his artistic journey in 1992 after attending the school of the Museum of Fine Arts. He participated in several collective exhibitions in the Boston area, including the Fort Point Channel art studios. He relocated to St. Petersburg, Fla. in 1999 where he continues to produce art in his private home studio.

“My work often feels like a visual diary of my life. The paintings are the manifestations of my emotional state at the time of their creation. So much so, that upon viewing them at a later time, I am drawn back to that prior period and its emotional history," says the artist. "The works are deeply personal and incredibly private. Yet it is my intent to only provide a catalyst for the viewer emotionally, to glean their own emotional context."

The daas gallery invites all art lovers and collectors to meet the artist at the opening reception, which starts at 6 p.m. The exhibition will be on display until Jan. 29. Regular gallery hours are Tuesday to Saturday from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. More information is available at www.daasgallery.com. ¦




Article in Gulf and Main magazine may/june 2011
2011-05-12
WHAT'S THE SECRET?
When it comes to revealing their techniques, artists tend to subscribe to one of three schools of thought

by Veron Ennis

For centuries, artists have studied as apprentices under master artists. Today, many artists still go to universities, have residencies, or take workshops in order to learn techniques from others in their field. And they aren’t alone in wanting to know the secrets behind masterful artworks: Many art admirers also desire to peek behind the studio curtain and see how an artist creates his work.
There are three schools of thought among artists when it comes to deciding how much of their processes to reveal. There are those who tell all, artists who not only explain their techniques in great detail to buyers and other artists alike, but also go as far as to hold workshops, teaching in a hands-on fashion how to create as they themselves create.

Artist Anna Tomczak teaches her photographic image transfer techniques in workshops at museums, art centers, and at her studio in Lake Helen, Florida. She admits that sharing her process greatly increases interest in her work, and that her students often end up as buyers.

Tomczak produces gorgeous, large-format Polaroid image transfers. People often ask how she creates the transparent and layered effect in her images, thinking that she must use multiple exposures or a digital-editing software like Photoshop. Quenching their curiosity, she explains to them that her subjects are composed in front of the camera using only one exposure, set up as layered objects in an assemblage.

Over the years of teaching her technique, Tomczak has never once seen anyone replicate her work. “Maybe an imitation, but not a duplication,” she says. “[E]veryone works with a different application of techniques and ideas.” She enjoys watching her students create various interpretations within each technique. And as she frankly states, “All methods of making artwork have been shared over the centuries of making art.”

Ric Moreira agrees with the idea that artists have been modifying other artists’ techniques since the beginning of civilization. He is of the second school of thought: share much, but not all. A chef who is reluctant to give out his recipes might leave out a key ingredient so that a dish can’t be replicated exactly. In the same way, Moreira keeps some aspects of his technique a secret.

Moreira primarily paints in oils, occasionally using mixed media, and is frequently asked how he manages to paint layers in such a way that the surface remains flat yet seems to have texture and depth. To those who ask, he’ll explain that he first applies a thick layer of oil paint followed by washes of color diluted by turpentine.

“I feel that talking about your technique to prospective buyers is necessary,” says the St. Petersburg–based artist. “People will connect more with a piece of art if they’ve had a chance to talk to the artist about his or her technique.”

Like Tomczak, Moreira believes that every artist has a unique visual language that cannot be replicated. Even so, he avoids sharing too much. “All pieces of art need a bit of mystery, so if the viewer wonders a bit about the process, it’s a good thing,” he says.

For artists of the third school of thought, mystery is a must. Scottish artist Ronnie Ford keeps the secret to his technique locked away, and for good reason. “It is the unique and mysterious which brings people into my work and which they find intriguing,” he says. “The mystery contributes to interest in and sales of work.”

Ford’s “texturescapes” are breathtaking as well as baffling. His vibrant use of color is eye-catching from any distance, but what really draws the viewer in close is the magnificent depth created by Ford’s texturizing technique.

“It has taken me many years of learning, exploration, experimentation, rule-breaking, and invention to see and portray the landscape as I do,” says Ford, who has a home in Cape Coral. “A lifetime’s experience cannot be easily shared.”

Ford is not a stranger to teaching; he was a full-time art teacher for twenty-seven years. But he feels teaching his exact technique to students lacks value. “The value is in opening the door to creativity and guiding students to find their own talent, their own style, their own niche, and to help them in that direction,” he says.

Indeed, teaching artists to explore, experiment, and discover techniques on their own can be a necessary and valuable lesson. However, if the technique can be easily shared (unlike Ford’s), guiding a fellow artist through the process, then allowing them to adapt the technique to their own style, is beneficial to the progression of art as a whole.

All artists have approached a work of art that has piqued their curiosity and wondered, “How did they do that?” Tomczak dreams of talking technique with Antoni Tàpies, a Spaniard who created the Fundació Antoni Tàpies in Barcelona in 1984 to promote the study and knowledge of contemporary art and is still alive and painting in his late eighties.

Moreira would love to learn from the late Willem de Kooning. “His paintings have such a raw quality about them,” he says. “He used total abstract expression to create canvases full of emotional content.”

Most artists and art lovers agree that questions and answers about artists’ techniques are a natural and fundamental part of the artistic experience. But an artist’s desire to keep those techniques a secret is undoubtedly respected as well.

Veron Ennis is a Sanibel-based artist, curator, and freelance writer for the contemporary arts.


Solo show at daas Gallery
2011-05-12
After a successful first solo show at daas Gallery in Fort Myers. I moved to a small studio space at the St. Petersburg Clay Company. Being around ceramic artists and seeing how they go about applying color and glazes to their clay pieces, has inspired me to experiment with different materials and textures. My paintings are evolving in a new dirrection.
I will be adding my metallic glazes series to this web page soon.

Comments

Alicia Brown
2009-07-29 13:13:15
interesting compositions
Rui MAdeO
2009-06-04 11:43:03
nice planes , a mix of sounds and silence .
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